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Dr. Pál Dunay, professor of NATO and European Security Issues at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies, talks about the “Role of NATO in Crisis Management” to 42 participants from 25 countries attending the Marshall Center’s Seminar on Regional Security Jan. 26. For more photos of #SRS16_04, visit the Marshall Center Photo Gallery. (Marshall Center photo by Karl-Heinz Wedhorn/RELEASED)

GARMISCH-PARTENKIRCHEN, Germany (Jan. 27 2015) – Dr. Pál Dunay, professor of NATO and European Security Issues at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies, and Marshall Center's Senior German Professor Dr. Ralf Roloff talk about the role of the European Union, NATO and Organization for Security Cooperation in Europe to 42 participants from 25 countries attending the Marshall Center’s Seminar on Regional Security Jan. 26.

Seminar on Regional Security focuses specifically on regional security dynamics. This is the fourth iteration of this resident program at the Marshall Center.

Roloff talked about the EU and crisis management, and whether or not the comprehensive approach was an EU concept.

He explained how to establish a culture of coordination and the EU’s role in crisis management to include actors, instruments and resources. He showcased the case study on the Horn of Africa and talked about lesson learned.

Roloff has been the Marshall Center’s senior German professor since 2003. He is also the Director of Master in International Security Studies Program since 2010, and Professor (apl), Universität der Bundeswehr München since 2015.

Addressing NATO’s role, Dunay talked about Crisis, Crisis Management, Objectives, Organization, Crisis Management Process, Challenges, Afghanistan and Ukraine.

Dunay also presented “The Role of the Organization for Security Cooperation in Europe in Conflict Management,” where he talked about the distinctive features of OSCE, pros and cons of OSCE, the conflict management cycle, and OSCE conflict management role since 1992.

Dunay's research interest extends to various issues of European security with an emphasis on East-central Europe and Eastern Europe, Central Asia, the OSCE, the legality of the use of force, and integration and disintegration in the post-Soviet space.

The Marshall Center’s #SRS16_04 started Jan. 21 and ended Feb. 11. there are 42 participants from 25 countries: Albania Armenia, Azerbaijan; Bosnia & Herzegovina; Bulgaria; Croatia; Czech Republic; Estonia; Georgia; Germany; Greece; Kazakhstan; Kosovo; Latvia; Lithuania; Macedonia; Moldovia; Mongolia; Montenegro; Republic of Korea; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia; Ukraine; and, United States.

During #SRS16_04, five case studies will be examined: Ukraine; Libya; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Georgia; and, Syria.

Participant Overview: 18 are Marshall Center alumni; 13 from the military in ranks O-4 to O-6; 28 from civilian organizations; 29 males and 12 females; and 38 speak English with three speaking Russian.

Organizations Represented: 12 from Ministry of Defense, eight from Ministry of Foreign Affairs; four from Ministry of Interior or Internal Security; four from cabinet level ministries; one from legislative branch; one from police department, one from non-governmental organization; one from an academic institution.

Marshall Center stakeholders and supports can follow the action on Twitter with the hashtag: #SRS16_04. In addition, daily photos of #SRS16_04, can be found on the Marshall Center's Photo Gallery.