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Advancing the German cyber reserve

At The Ready

January 2021, Number 10.04

“Tensions between the Western and Eastern political blocs decreased rapidly and substantially after the demise of the Soviet Union in 1991. Consequently, politicians in the reunified Germany increasingly questioned the rationale of compulsory military service until it was finally paused and quasi-disestablished in 2011. Thereafter, the Bundeswehr became an all-volunteer army, which has since been faced with the mounting challenge of finding sufficient numbers of appropriate recruits. Hence, the goals of increasing the importance of the reserve force and of shifting responsibilities from active service members to reservists have gained popularity in recent years. A primary building block of the pertinent master plan of the Ministry of Defense (MoD) is the deployment of an efficient cyber reserve.

The Military Information and Cyber Domain Service (MCS) is in charge of organizing all aspects of the cyber reserve. The MCS is the youngest branch of the military part of Germany’s federal defense force, which also includes the Army, Navy, Air Force, Joint Support Service and Joint Medical Service. It is responsible for the cyber, information technology (IT), military intelligence, geoinformation and operative communications units. Unlike the traditional branches of the military, the MCS can act largely autonomously...”

Excerpt from Rupert Brandmeier et al., “At The Ready,” per Concordiam: Journal of European Security Defense Issues  10, No. 4, 2021: 24-29.

Rupert Brandmeier has held various managerial positions in the international business environment. He has extensive experience as an academic researcher and lecturer in the fields of business administration and economics, cyber security and archaeology.

Jörn-Alexander Heye is a German signal officer (reserve) with more than 28 years of experience, many of them in international missions in the United Arab Emirates and the Middle East. He has been a senior principal consultant, team leader, project manager and program manager in various technical and business projects in Germany and abroad.

Dr. Florian Rupp and Clemens Woywod are military reserve officers serving in the German Cyber and Information Domain Service.

This article reflects the views of the author and are not necessarily the official policy of the United States, Germany, or any other governments.