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von muenchow teaching at camp butmir ii

Dr. Sebastian von Münchow, Marshall Center’s lecturer of security studies and international and European law, teaches at the Euro-Atlantic Security Course by the Peace Support Operations Training Center at the European Union Force Headquarters in Camp Butmir, Sarajevo, Nov. 27.

By GCMC Public Affairs


SARAJEVO, (Dec. 7, 2017) – Dr. Pál Dunay, professor of NATO and European security issues for the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies, and Dr. Sebastian von Münchow, Marshall Center’s lecturer of security studies and international and European law, taught 28 students during the Euro-Atlantic Security Course by the Peace Support Operations Training Center at the European Union Force Headquarters in Camp Butmir, Sarajevo, Nov. 27 to 30.

They were invited to complement the presentations by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe Mission to Bosnia and Hercegovina, United Nations Development Program and U.S. Embassy in Sarajevo.

Participants were mostly from BiH, but some participants were from Serbia, Albania and Macedonia, as well as guests from Austria, Georgia and Ukraine.

Approximately half of the attendees were Armed Forces staff, and some work for other parts of the Bosnian security architecture. The other half of the audience were students of philosophy and political sciences from the Universities of Sarajevo, Mostar and Pale.

Dunay spoke about "Eurasian Geopolitical Context and its Security Implications in the 21st Century" and "Russia and Europe in Contemporary Security."

Von Münchow gave presentations on "EU in 2030 - A Global Geopolitical Player or just an Economical Powerhouse?" and "EU's Capability of Peacebuilding in the Western Balkans.”

Bosnia and Hercegovina on its way to Euro-Atlantic Integration, said Dunay.

“On the eve of the up-coming start of the negotiations with the EU after candidate status is granted, the attendees were keen to learn anything what has to do with the fulfillment of the Copenhagen criteria or the implementation of the so-called Acquis Communautaire into national legislation,” Dunay said. “It seems that the future membership-perspective reinforced hope among the younger generation.”

Dunay added, “In this context it is worth mentioning that students from all Bosnian ethnic groups perform in a collegial manner with one another. In side talks, they blame the major political protagonists in feeding the ethnic disintegration.”

Von Münchow gave presentations on "EU in 2030 - A Global Geopolitical Player or just an Economical Powerhouse?" and "EU's Capability of Peacebuilding in the Western Balkans.”

Bosnia applied for membership about a year ago. The European Commission has sent a questionnaire to the Bosnian Government.

“This is usually the first sign that candidate status might be granted,” said von Münchow.